Demob Happy ‘Holy Doom’ Review

Brighton-based Demob Happy return with 11 tracks overflowing with hip-thrusting grooves, sending even the most sensible of us into a sexually-carnivorous rage.

The album opens with ‘Liar in Your Head’, a riff-heavy/ooo-lah-lah melody, which sounds as if it were sculpted from clay by Josh Homme immediately after a worldwide orgy. It certainly sets the tempo of the album, and bolsters the bands perfected sound as a rejuvenated 3-piece. Arguably the leading single so far, ‘Be Your Man’ follows and delves deeper into the psych-sex dungeon, experimenting with 3 part harmonies, distortion fuzzier than the upper lip of Ron Swanson, and unrelenting pop-hooks.

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‘Be Your Man’ Music Video

The provocative lyrics in ‘I Wanna Leave (Alive),’ ooze confidently lustful conquests, and dark soul searching; the band’s harmony on the chorus excites you more than your mum watching 50 Shades of Grey. The next track, ‘Maker of Mine’, features octaves of orgasm from Adam Godfrey’s guitar.

Of course the single, ‘Holy Doom’ of, ‘Holy Doom’, begins with an ambient build-up, and a drum roll introduces a short but sweet guitar solo. The whole single entices you with its high-pitched vocals, and a psychedelic fuzz from the guitar increasing as the song continues.

Despite the line-up change, the band’s second studio album has gifted fans with something relatable, gratifying and set a precedent for what Demob are capable of. Holy Doom? Holy Damn, what an album.

Listen to the album on Spotify now.

Funky, Fun and Free. The Orielles release their much anticipated Debut Album ‘Silver Dollar Moment’.

Last time we met Esme-Dee, Henry and Sidonie they graced the prestigious stage at The 100 Club in London. They hinted that their album was on the brink of completion, and after flooding the venue with their signature reverb/funk jams our palettes were craving for that release.

Months down the line, that day has finally come. ‘Silver Dollar Moment’ represents a new era for the band, seemingly abandoning the more basic surfy pop songs in favour of a sound filled with synths, cow bells and intensely funky rhythm sections. Esme-Dee pointed this out when we spoke in September, stating that “post-punk, funk and dancey stuff” has had an influence on their evolving sound.

The album opens with ‘Mango’ which still holds resonance to the bands surf roots, but bolsters this new fuller sound. The lyrics transport you to a sunny mind-set filled with palm trees and hippies as far as the eye can see.

The albums leading single, I Only Bought It For The Bottle, has been around for a few months and gave insight into the bands funk fetish. But I don’t think anyone could have predicted how juicy the outcome would be. Released on a cold English day, this album has the ability to take you away from normality, in a similar fashion that Manchester kings The Stone Roses Debut, painted a skeletal Manchester in 80’s indie, dance pop songs.

If you haven’t already, get grooving to Silver Dollar Moment at your nearest convenience.

Shame Album Drop: Songs of Praise

An anticipated album from a band that’s shaping the modern British post-punk scene, bringing with it the old school guitar and vocal influences of the 70’s and 80’s such as The Clash, The Fall, and The Stranglers: Songs of Praise is a beautiful mix of British punk and modern post-punk.

‘Songs of Praise’ features singles such as ‘Gold Hole’, a bluesy punk rock track in which the guitars provoke a tone of West Coast post-punk/garage rock bands like FIDLAR and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – but with the grit of a South London punk band. Another single featured, released in 2016, is ‘The Lick’, where Josh Finerty’s bass line is an enticingly 80’s groove throughout – marking their influences from the golden years of British punk.

The five-piece’s latest single, ‘One Rizla’, will also be included. Charlie Steen’s lyrics joke about the music industry’s obsession with image and reputation, “My nails ain’t manicured/My voice ain’t the best you’ve heard/And you can choose to hate my words/But do I give a fuck”. The lyrics throughout the album may have tongue-in-cheek overtones, but they call out real issues and cut deep. In the song, ‘Tasteless’ – in which the riffs and licks of the guitars inspire head-banging throughout – it includes the lyrics, “Sodomy had a place in the past/But now it’s fashionable”, and talks about the tastelessness of celebrities, musicians and politicians who get called out for it, “internal crisis glued to an ego’s need”.

‘Songs of Praise’ is sure to be an explosive start to 2018, and makes us at GreatWave excited for more from Shame. The album can be found on bandcamp, Apple Music, and various record shops.